COVID-19: CDC Unveils Highly-Anticipated Guidelines For Those Who Are Fully Vaccinated

Link: https://dailyvoice.com/new-york/northsalem/news/covid-19-cdc-unveils-highly-anticipated-guidelines-for-those-who-are-fully-vaccinated/804610/

Excerpt:

Those fully vaccinated can:

Visit indoors with unvaccinated people from one other household without masks or physical distancing, if the unvaccinated people are at low risk for severe disease.

Visit others who are vaccinated indoors without masks or physical distancing

Skip testing and quarantine if exposed to someone who has COVID but is asymptomatic, but should monitor for symptoms for 14 days

Author(s): Joe Lombardi

Publication Date: 8 March 2021

Publication Site: Daily Voice

Cuomo Advisers Altered Report on Covid-19 Nursing-Home Deaths

Link: https://www.wsj.com/articles/cuomo-advisers-altered-report-on-covid-19-nursing-home-deaths-11614910855?mod=djemwhatsnews

Excerpt:

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s top advisers successfully pushed state health officials to strip a public report of data showing that more nursing-home residents had died of Covid-19 than the administration had acknowledged, according to people with knowledge of the report’s production.

The July report, which examined the factors that led to the spread of the virus in nursing homes, focused only on residents who died inside long-term-care facilities, leaving out those who had died in hospitals after becoming sick in nursing homes. As a result, the report said 6,432 nursing-home residents had died—a significant undercount of the death toll attributed to the state’s most vulnerable population, the people said. The initial version of the report said nearly 10,000 nursing-home residents had died in New York by July last year, one of the people said.

The changes Mr. Cuomo’s aides and health officials made to the nursing-home report, which haven’t been previously disclosed, reveal that the state possessed a fuller accounting of out-of-facility nursing-home deaths as early as the summer. The Health Department resisted calls by state and federal lawmakers, media outlets and others to release the data for another eight months.

Author(s): Joe Palazzolo, Jimmy Vielkind, Rebecca Davis O’Brien

Publication Date: 4 March 2021

Publication Site: Wall Street Journal

Why Cuomo Cooked the Books on Nursing-Home Deaths

Link: https://www.nationalreview.com/2021/03/why-cuomo-cooked-the-books-on-nursing-home-deaths/

Excerpt:

What DeRosa told lawmakers had them aghast. Not only had Cuomo misled them; he had, in DeRosa’s telling, done it in order to keep relevant information hidden from U.S. investigators. If the latter were true, Cuomo administration officials could well be guilty of federal-obstruction and false-statements crimes. In other words, so shameful was their actual reason for covering up nursing-home deaths — namely, to make a wayward governor look like a fantasy hero — that Cuomo administration officials figured it was better to be seen as potentially felonious than to admit their crude political motivation.

As the New York Times reported on Thursday night, in the spring of 2020, DeRosa and other members of Cuomo’s inner circle, who have no public-health background, studiously purged the nursing-home death data from a report compiled by state health officials. The Justice Department was not eyeing them at the time. That happened months later, in August, when the feds began seeking information about the treatment of, and record-keeping about, COVID-stricken nursing-home residents by New York and three other states.

So what was going on at the time of the purge? Well — whaddya know! — it turns out that was just when Cuomo was quietly securing the state ethics approvals that would permit him to earn outside income from a book he’d decided to write. The book would inform the world about his unparalleled mastery of the COVID crisis — which, oddly enough, he contemplated as a work of nonfiction.

Author(s): Andrew McCarthy

Publication Date: 6 March 2021

Publication Site: National Review

Why reopening US schools is so complicated

Link: https://www.technologyreview.com/2021/03/05/1020304/reopening-us-schools-complicated/

Excerpt:

The US can look to Europe for how this played out: European countries tried in-person learning last fall but began closing schools as B.1.1.7 swept through the continent. By December, countries including the Netherlands and Germany had shut down their schools in the face of rising case numbers. The CDC says it may need to update school reopening guidelines in light of new information about variants. 

This task is made more difficult because tracking the spread of variants in the US is tough right now. Compared with other countries, it has very few labs doing this work, and while more funding will help, Friedrich says there will still be a gap.

Author(s): Mia Sato

Publication Date: 5 March 2021

Publication Site: MIT Technology Review

Restaurants and other business can go back to full capacity on March 19 as Lamont rolls back COVID restrictions in CT

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Excerpt:

Gov. Ned Lamont said Thursday that Connecticut will eliminate capacity limits on restaurants, houses of worship, retailers and most businesses on March 19 but will retain mandates for social distancing and masks as a precaution against a resurgence of COVID-19.

The rollback comes as about 60% of Connecticut residents 65 and older have been vaccinated against the coronavirus, helping to drive down hospitalizations, new infections and deaths to their lowest point in 2021, though still higher than last summer.

The governor’s announcement was expected. It comes after Texas, Mississippi and three other states took more aggressive steps to end mask mandates and business restrictions, a move denounced as premature by President Joe Biden.

Author(s): MARK PAZNIOKAS, JENNA CARLESSO

Publication Date: 4 March 2021

Publication Site: CT Mirror

Coronavirus Deranges the Immune System in Complex and Deadly Ways

Excerpt:

Scientists say the coronavirus could undermine the immune system in several ways.

For example, it’s possible that immune cells become confused because some viral proteins resemble proteins found on human cells, Luning Prak said. It’s also possible that the coronavirus lurks in the body at very low levels even after patients recover from their initial infection.

“We’re still at the very beginning stages of this,” said Luning Prak, director of Penn Medicine’s Human Immunology Core Facility.

Author(s): Liz Szabo

Publication Date: 4 March 2021

Publication Site: Kaiser Health News

Doses of AstraZeneca’s Covid-19 Vaccine Pile Up in Europe Amid Government Restrictions

Link: https://www.wsj.com/articles/doses-of-astrazenecas-covid-19-vaccine-pile-up-in-europe-amid-government-restrictions-11614715968

Excerpt:

Europe’s reluctance to distribute millions of doses of AstraZeneca PLC’s Covid-19 vaccine is coming under pressure after the French government authorized use of the shot for some older people.

The French government announced it would allow people with comorbidities between the ages of 65 and 74 to receive the vaccine developed by Oxford University and AstraZeneca. New data from the U.K. on Monday showed just one dose of the vaccine was effective in preventing disease and deaths among adults aged 70 and older who had received it.

France’s move was a sharp departure from a month ago when President Emmanuel Macron told reporters that the vaccine was quasi ineffective for people older than 65, without providing evidence to back up his claim. The comments helped sow doubts across the European Union that still persist.

Author(s): Stacy Meichtry, Bojan Pancevski

Publication Date: 2 March 2021

Publication Site: Wall Street Journal

Implications of COVID-19 Mortality Patterns for Nursing Home Regulation in New York

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Excerpt:

In its January 28 report, the attorney general’s office argued that low staffing levels in nursing homes was associated with higher death rates from the novel coronavirus. As evidence of that connection, the report presented a table (reproduced in Table 1 below) comparing death rates in nursing homes based on their star ratings for staffing from the U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS).[5] It showed that homes with the lowest staffing grade of one star had an aggregate COVID-19 mortality rate of 7.13 percent, compared to 4.94 percent for homes with a five-star rating.

However, that table was based on the limited data available in mid-November, which encompassed 6,645 deaths, only half the number that are documented now.

When that table is brought up to date, it shows no clear association between lower staffing grades and higher coronavirus mortality (see Table 2). Homes with a three-star staff rating showed the largest percentage of deaths, at 13.62, compared to 12.98 for two-star homes and 12.14 for one-star homes.[6]

Author(s): Bill Hammond, Ian Kingsbury

Publication Date: 4 March 2021

Publication Site: Empire Center for Public Policy

How elimination versus suppression became Covid’s cold war

Link: https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2021/mar/03/covid-19-elimination-versus-suppression?mc_cid=919aa668d9&mc_eid=983bcf5922

Excerpt:

The rest of the world is pursuing a mitigation and suppression strategy, according to which we will have to live with Covid-19 and therefore we must learn to manage it – aiming for herd immunity by the most painless route possible. The poster child for this approach is Sweden’s chief epidemiologist, Anders Tegnell, who told me last week that elimination was a pipe dream for most of the world because even if a country were able to achieve it once, it would be impossible to prevent reintroductions without maintaining a costly and potentially restrictive surveillance apparatus. If the strategy failed, the country would have to revert to suppression anyway, but the population would have paid a much higher price. He too is in it for the long haul, he says; “sustainability” is his watchword. This is how he justifies the gradual tightening of restrictions in his country, from a very relaxed start.

And so the world is cleaved in two, with each bloc operating according to a different set of assumptions, in a kind of public health rerun of the cold war. One bloc assumes that Covid-19 can be eliminated, the other that it can’t. The latter thinks the former is chasing an impossible utopia. The former thinks the utopia could be achieved if only everyone pulled together.

Author(s): Laura Spinney

Publication Date: 3 March 2021

Publication Site: The Guardian

New U.S. Cases Ease, but Deaths Tick Higher

Link: https://www.wsj.com/livecoverage/covid-2021-03-03/card/18LFgjsjQkJOdGZpqjYK

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Excerpt:

There were 55,071 new cases reported in the U.S. for Tuesday, according to the latest data compiled by Johns Hopkins University. That was down from 58,810 a day earlier, and 71,436 a week earlier.

Reported U.S. deaths related to Covid-19 increased Tuesday to 1,924, from 1,566 a day earlier, according to the latest Johns Hopkins data.

While both new cases and deaths are down from January’s highs, deaths have begun to trend upward in the past week. The seven-day moving average of daily reported deaths, which smooths out irregularities in the data, was 2,046 as of Monday, according to a Wall Street Journal analysis of Johns Hopkins data. The 14-day average was 1,984. When the seven-day average is higher than the 14-day average, as it has been since last Wednesday, it indicates deaths are on the rise.

Author(s): Adam Martin

Publication Date: 3 March 2021

Publication Site: Wall Street Journal