What NJ Tells Creditors On Benefits

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According to the EMMA website New Jersey borrowed another $400 million last week for which they had to provide an Official Statement which included 20 pages on the situation with public pensions and benefits. Excerpts follow.

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The contribution of the Lottery Enterprise is valued as of June 30, 2020 at $12.569 billion, based on a 30-year straight line amortization. However, the first reevaluation of the value of the Lottery Enterprise required by LECA has not yet been performed. If the contribution of the Lottery Enterprise were not taken into consideration in calculating the funded ratio of the Pension Plans, the funded ratio of the Pension Plans as of June 30, 2020 would have been 37.6% instead of 49.8%. (page I-60)

Author(s): John Bury

Publication Date: 3 May 2021

Publication Site: Burypensions

NJ Taxpayers To Be Byrned Again

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The state income tax eventually failed to stem the rise in the highest property taxes in the country since it was based on providing money to hundreds of de facto fiefdoms with no oversight. Ms. Egea goes on to speculate that Governor Murphy, with an even more pressing need for revenue, has another new tax in mind:

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In 1976, New Jersey voters passed a constitutional amendment that dedicated the entire income tax to the Property Tax Relief Fund and lower property taxes in 1997 did help Brendan Byrne get reelected. There is no time for that this year so expect the massive debt and structural budget deficit to be the excuse for this new tax that should be hitting in 2022.

Author(s): John Bury

Publication Date: 26 April 2021

Publication Site: Burypensions

NJ Pension CAFR

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The Comprehensive Audited Financial Statement Report (CAFR) for the State of New Jersey, Division of Pensions and Benefits, as of June 30, 2020 appeared on the state website this month which means the actuarial reports should be out soon.

But, for now, some CAFR excerpts:

Financial Highlights Fiduciary Funds –Pension Trust Funds and Other Postemployment Benefit (OPEB) Plan (page 3)

Fiduciary net position decreased by $2.4 billion as a result of this year’s operations from $87.3 billion to $84.9 billion.

Additions for the year are $10.2 billion, which are comprised of member, employer, nonemployer, and employer specific and other pension contributions of $8.9 billion and net investment income of $1.3 billion.

Deductions for the year are $12.7 billion, which are comprised of benefits, refund payments, and transfers of $12.6 billion and administrative expenses of $62.0 million.

Author(s): John Bury

Publication Date: 21 April 2021

Publication Site: Burypensions

NJ Localities Meeting Pension Obligations

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I am researching what counties been paying into the New Jersey Retirement System for their Public Employees (PERS) and Police and Fire Personnel (PFRS) since Union County has been budgeting more than they were billed but the 2021 budgets for 7 of the 21 counties are not out yet so that project is on hold.

But in going over the history of what Union County has been sending to PERS and PFRS since 2005 (which presumably would be in line with other localities) there have been some politically motivated swings but, bottom line, Union County’s ‘fair share’ is now defined as 25 times more than what it was in 2005 for PERS and 8 times more for PFRS.

Author(s): John Bury

Publication Date: 20 April 2021

Publication Site: Burypensions

NJ Pension Palaver

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Public employees and their unions are certainly to blame for allowing promises made to not be fully funded,

Those contributions that public employees make are negotiated at levels they have input into (nothing to do with funding benefits honestly); and

What worthwhile programs for New Jerseyans did those tens of billions of dollars in missed payments fund and, if that money was invested wisely, shouldn’t New Jerseyans be reaping some benefits around now? If the money was not invested wisely then why begrudge not having more of it to waste?

Author(s): John Bury

Publication Date: 11 April 2021

Publication Site: Burypensions

Error or Craft?

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Since I can’t find where they define time-weighting the best I can do is assume that the 3.04% rate of return for June 30, 2015 was mistakenly augmented to 3.41% which was enough to drop the rate of return below the 6.36% barrier.

If anyone has anything else, please share.

Author(s): John Bury

Publication Date: 30 March 2021

Publication Site: Burypensions

NJ Local Pension Bills

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Annual pension contributions from local employers in New Jersey come due next week based on the June 30, 2019 actuarial valuations. The state website only has the breakdown in pdf format but it was easy enough to export the numbers into excel for the PERS and PFRS plans.

Many local employers are also drafting their 2021 budgets so it was interesting to see what one of them (Union County) allocated as pensions costs for 2021.

Author(s): John Bury

Publication Date: 25 March 2021

Publication Site: Burypensions

Local Control of NJ PERS?

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S3522, which could mean unions will need to expand their corral of bought politicians to those who would control the local part of the New Jersey Public Employee Retirement System (PERS), was introduced yesterday in the legislature apparently to the surprise of a Senate committee that rejected it, according to Politico.

Author(s): John Bury

Publication Date: 23 March 2021

Publication Site: Burypensions

Who Needs MPRA?

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A scant week after the multiemployer pension bailout was enacted one large plan reversed course towards that pot of gold.

Their application withdrawal letter just popped up on the MPRA website.

Plan NameAmerican Federation of Musicians and Employers’ Pension Fund and Subsidiary

EIN/PN: 51-6120204/001

Total participants @ 3/31/20: 51,295 including:

Retirees: 17,116

Separated but entitled to benefits: 13,777

Still working: 20,402

Author(s): John Bury

Publication Date: 18 March 2021

Publication Site: Burypensions

American Rescue Plan Act of 2021 (5) 9705

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Going through the text of the stimulus bill, section 9705 turns to funding relief for Single Employer plans by returning to the 15 year amortization schedule for minimum funding purposes for 2022 (with optional election for 2019, 2020, and 2021) as if draconian PBGC premiums were not enough in themselves to discourage underfunding.

Author(s): John Bury

Publication Date: 16 March 2021

Publication Site: Burypensions