Pension and Executive Compensation Provisions in the American Rescue Plan Act

Link: https://www.seyfarth.com/news-insights/pension-and-executive-compensation-provisions-in-the-american-rescue-plan-act.html

Excerpt:

Seyfarth Synopsis: On March 11, 2021, President Biden signed into law the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021 (“ARPA”), the $1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief bill.  ARPA includes various forms of multiemployer and single employer pension plan relief, as well as certain executive compensation changes under Section 162(m) of the Internal Revenue Code (“Code”), which are discussed further below. Please see our companion Client Alert on the other employee benefit items of interest in ARPA here.

Author(s): Seong Kim, Christina M. Cerasale, Kaley M. Ventura, Alan B. Cabral

Publication Date: 11 March 2021

Publication Site: Seyfarth

COMMENTARY: COVID stimulus won’t cure the pension pandemic

Link: https://fredericksburg.com/opinion/commentary-covid-stimulus-won-t-cure-the-pension-pandemic/article_d33a07f1-ee2d-59f4-9e24-c7380f2020a8.html

Excerpt:

While state and local governments cannot put their stimulus directly towards pensions, depending on how the federal government enforces this restriction, they will still have the leeway to free up money that can then go towards pensions (or be spent on budgetary items that have been cut in recent years due to growing pension obligations).

….

Public pensions will continue to use overly optimistic assumptions about how their investments will perform, accounting tricks that mask the true size of their pension liabilities, and underreport how much money is needed to fund them.

They will also continue to expose themselves to risky investments in order to attempt to shore up funding gaps. In fact, as the fiscal health of pensions plummeted following the 2008 financial crisis, pension plans only doubled down on the practice.

Author(s): Daniel J. Smith, Eileen Norcross

Publication Date: 27 March 2021

Publication Site: The Free Lance-Star

Fact-checking a GOP talking point on state, local relief in the American Rescue Plan

Link: https://www.politifact.com/article/2021/mar/19/fact-checking-gop-talking-point-state-local-relief/

Excerpt:

• The American Rescue Plan signed by President Joe Biden allocates state and local aid based on the extent of unemployment in a state in late 2020. Critics say this punishes states that opened their economies earlier, under the assumption that their unemployment levels were lower.

• It’s not so clear-cut. Preliminary academic research shows that government policies on reopening had only a modest impact on unemployment. States that depend on especially hard-hit industries like tourism and oil and gas show high unemployment regardless of the government policy.

• Experts say that no method for targeting aid to the states is perfect; each has pluses and minuses.

Author(s): Louis Jacobson

Publication Date: 19 March 2021

Publication Site: PolitiFact

State Aid in American Rescue Plan Act Is 116 Times States’ Revenue Losses

Excerpt:

Forty-three states and the District of Columbia have now published revenue data for all 12 months of 2020; in those states, revenues are up $3.2 billion in aggregate compared to the previous calendar year, thanks to robust gains in financial markets and federal assistance that has kept businesses afloat and provided benefits to individuals. Some of those are, indeed, taxable benefits, in the case of enhanced and expanded unemployment compensation benefits. For the remaining seven states, it is necessary to project revenues through the end of the calendar year based either on U.S. Census Bureau data through the three quarters, or, in Nevada and New Mexico, state data running through October and November respectively.

These adjustments yield an aggregate $1.7 billion decline in state revenues. Under the American Rescue Plan Act, states would receive $195.3 billion in aid, divided according to each state’s share of national unemployed workers. Under Senate amendments, a further adjustment is made to ensure that each state receives, at minimum, the amount it was allocated for purposes of the Coronavirus Relief Fund under the CARES Act. While some conservative lawmakers have criticized this allocation model (which benefits states with steeper job losses) on the grounds that different state policies and approaches may yield some of this variation and that the federal government should be neutral to these decisions, we have argued previously that using the change in unemployment is a more efficient targeting method than allocating aid per capita. Far less defensible, however, is the notion that aid to states should be 116 times the decline in state revenues—especially since the federal government has already provided over $200 billion in fungible aid to subnational governments.

Author(s): Jared Walczak

Publication Date: 3 March 2021

Publication Site: Tax Foundation

Democrats make low-tax states an offer they should refuse

Link: https://thehill.com/opinion/campaign/543992-democrats-make-low-tax-states-an-offer-they-should-refuse#new_tab

Excerpt:

States are discovering and news outlets are reporting some surprising features of the new law. For starters, the President Biden-approved American Rescue Plan tweaks the funding formula to distribute funding based on average unemployment during the three final months of 2020 — rewarding Democratic-controlled states like New York, California and Illinois for their draconian COVID policies that resulted in the nation’s highest levels of unemployment. And it offers states billions more in Medicaid funding if they agree to boost their own Medicaid spending. 

Perhaps the most troubling is a legislative rider barring states that accept the aid from using the funds “to either directly or indirectly offset a reduction in the net tax revenue” derived “from a change in law, regulation, or administrative interpretation during the covered period that reduces any tax (by providing for a reduction in a rate, a rebate, a deduction, a credit, or otherwise) or delays the imposition of any tax or tax increase.” 

Author(s): MICHAEL G. FRANC

Publication Date: 19 March 2021

Publication Site: The Hill

Keeping promises to pensioners

Link: https://www.post-gazette.com/opinion/editorials/2021/03/20/Keeping-promises-to-pensioners/stories/202103050023

Excerpt:

In 2018, administrators of the Western Pennsylvania Teamsters and Employers Pension Fund announced it would cut benefits by 30% for 17,000 Pittsburgh-area retirees or their beneficiary survivors. The cut was needed to avoid insolvency and an accompanying collapse of the pension structure. Now, it is expected that those cuts will be restored.

Pension protection is critical, both for its morality and for its necessity. Pensions are a lifeline for older citizens. They should not lose their retirement money at the time they are depending on it — when they are no longer able or intending to work. The alternative reasonably could be poverty.

Were it not for the language in the new federal law, many people who spent decades toiling in union jobs would be in jeopardy of losing their benefits through no wrongdoing on their part. Forces conspired to put their retirement plans at risk. These are plans that were negotiated. These are plans that were promised. Nonetheless, many of the employers have gone out of business and have left their pension liabilities inadequately funded.

Author(s): Editorial board

Publication Date: 20 March 2021

Publication Site: Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

The Pension Bailouts Begin

Link: https://www.wsj.com/articles/the-pension-bailouts-begin-11616107042

Excerpt:

It was perhaps inevitable that Congress would bail out multi-employer pensions for the Teamsters and other private unions after doing so for coal miners in 2019. But the Democrats’ spending bill does nothing to fix the structural problems that have made these union pensions funds so sick.

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Unions like the plans because workers continue to accrue benefits if they switch employers. If one business goes bankrupt, others must pick up the cost for worker benefits. Workers also don’t lose benefits—at least not immediately—if union-driven costs contribute to putting employers out of business.

But the plans are riddled with perverse incentives that make them risky. Employers award generous benefits and make paltry contributions so they can pay higher wages. Pension funds invest in riskier assets to achieve higher returns to support generous benefits and low contributions, but their investments often underperform. As a result, 430 or so multi-employer plans are now at risk of failing.

Author(s): Editorial Board

Publication Date: 18 March 2021

Publication Site: Wall Street Journal

Will American Rescue Plan Act Multiemployer Pension Provisions Bring Relief to Employers?

Link: https://www.natlawreview.com/article/will-american-rescue-plan-act-multiemployer-pension-provisions-bring-relief-to

Excerpt:

Further, under EPPRA, the interest rate used to calculate withdrawal liability for plans receiving assistance is limited. The interest rate used to calculate withdrawal liability would be capped, in part, by subsections of ERISA, plus 2%, which would currently be approximately 5%. Of course, the lower the interest rate used by a plan for this purpose, the higher the resulting employer withdrawal liability.

Importantly, less than 15% of the 1,400 multiemployer pension plans will receive financial assistance. Accordingly, the bulk of employer obligations to multiemployer plans, even those that are significantly underfunded, will be unaffected by EPPRA. With respect to employers who contribute to plans that receive EPPRA assistance, PBGC is expected to issue guidance that would limit (in whole or in part) the benefit of such assistance to employers.

The impact of EPPRA’s special financial assistance on contributing employers will largely depend on PBGC regulations and guidance. Employers who are currently confronted with an immediate decision regarding withdrawal from a multiemployer pension plan (for example, employers in the middle of labor negotiations) likely will need to exercise patience pending the issuance of PBGC guidance.

Author(s): Paul A. Friedman, Robert R. Perry, David M. Pixley

Publication Date: 15 March 2021

Publication Site: National Law Review

American Rescue Plan Act of 2021 (4) 9704

Graphic:

Excerpt:

Going through the text of the stimulus bill, section 9704 is the meat of the bailout but those 10 pages might be a little hard going so I have added my emphasis.

What struck me on initial reading is that there does not seem to be any cap on those one-time lump sum assistance payments and applicants may be able to value future benefits too. That is, a union with the foresight to sponsor a pension that is almost broke could entice employers to enter their union with the offer of providing their employees with a good pension at a cost that taxpayers will subsidize. Sounds too stupid to be real except if the law were entirely drafted by lawyers for the unions.

Author(s): John Bury

Publication Date: 15 March 2021

Publication Site: Burypensions

COVID rescue package gives failing pension plans a $86 billion bailout, stirring hope and criticisms

Link: https://www.bostonglobe.com/2021/03/13/nation/covid-rescue-package-gives-failing-pension-plans-86-billion-bailout-stirring-hope-criticisms/

Excerpt:

In the shadow of stimulus checks and extra unemployment aid, Democratic lawmakers extended another hand in the $1.9 trillion pandemic relief package: a long-sought bailout for failing private pension plans.

The union-backed provision, touted for years by Representative Richard E. Neal, was signed into law Thursday by President Biden as part of the larger COVID-19 stimulus bill. It promises to set aside an estimated $86 billion — and some say possibly far more — in grants for multi-employer retirement plans that were careening toward insolvency even before the pandemic hit.

Without it, the multi-employer pension plans for more than a million truckers, warehouse and retail workers, and others could collapse, unions and congressional Democrats warn. In New England alone, the measure could help preserve the promised retirements of at least 70,000 Teamster members, union officials said.

Author(s): Matt Stout

Publication Date: 13 March 2021

Publication Site: Boston Globe

Federal COVID-19 Bailout Prohibits States From Cutting Taxes

Excerpt:

Since the federal government is giving states money that they don’t need, there are two things state lawmakers can do: Use the federal money to grow government spending or pass that extra cash along to taxpayers by lowering their tax burdens.

However, the Senate inserted language in the American Rescue Plan expressly telling states that they “shall not use the funds provided…to either directly or indirectly offset a reduction in the net tax revenue,” or do anything that “reduces any tax (by providing for a reduction in a rate, a rebate, a deduction, a credit, or otherwise) or delays the imposition of any tax or tax increase.”

That same section of the bill also bans states from depositing the federal bailout into their public pension funds. That’s probably a good idea, but it’s pretty ironic considering that the American Rescue Plan also contains a completely indefensible bailout of some private-sector pension funds run by labor unions.

Author(s): Eric Boehm

Publication Date: 10 March 2021

Publication Site: Reason

Multiemployer Pension Relief Expected by March 14

Link: https://www.morganlewis.com/blogs/mlbenebits/2021/03/multiemployer-pension-relief-expected-by-march-14

Excerpt:

EPPRA takes a far more direct approach to the problem than prior proposals. Under EPPRA, eligible plans can receive financial assistance from a new Treasury-backed PBGC fund. The available financial assistance will be sufficient for eligible plans to pay all benefits for 30 years. This includes any benefits previously suspended under the Multiemployer Pension Reform Act of 2014 (MPRA), which must be restored by plans that apply for assistance under EPPRA. EPPRA’s special financial assistance will not, however, cover adjustable benefits that have been cut under a rehabilitation plan.

The assistance is payable in a single lump sum without any repayment obligation. To qualify for assistance, a multiemployer pension plan must meet one of four conditions:

1. Be in critical and declining status

2. Have previously imposed a benefit suspension under MPRA

3. Be in critical status, have a modified funded percentage of less than 40% on a current liability basis, and have a ratio of active to inactive participants of less than 2 to 3

4. Be insolvent

The PBGC may prioritize plans that are insolvent, that require more than $1 billion of assistance, or that have suspended benefits under MPRA.

Author(s): Timothy P. Lynch, Daniel R. Salemi, Benjamin T. Kelly

Publication Date: 9 March 2021

Publication Site: Morgan Lewis