One year in, COVID-19’s uneven spread across the US continues

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Figure 2 provides a 12-month overview of COVID-19 rates for each of the four census regions. The winding path started with highest case rates in the Northeast, then moved to the South and West regions, which recorded especially high new case rates in July. In August and September, Midwest rates began to rise and dwarfed those of other regions in October and November. By December, the other three regions, especially the West, showed sharp gains and remained high in January, while Midwest rates fell from those of the previous two months.

In February 2021, new case rates in all four regions took a substantial downward fall from the holiday surge. Nonetheless, February new COVID-19 case rates for the Northeast, South, and West regions were still higher than rates in most months prior to November. The Midwest’s February rates were lower than in any month prior to September.

Author(s): William H. Frey

Publication Date: 5 March 2021

Publication Site: Brookings

Blocked shots? City limiting its share of United Center vaccinations to five ZIP codes hit hard by COVID-19

Link: https://chicago.suntimes.com/coronavirus/2021/3/10/22323505/illinois-coronavirus-united-center-vaccinations-cases-deaths-pritzker-covid-19-mar-10

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In a bid to vaccinate more people of color in neighborhoods hit hard by COVID-19, city officials Wednesday limited registration for United Center appointments to Chicagoans in a handful of South and Southwest Side neighborhoods.

Anyone who lives in the 60608, 60619, 60620, 60649 or 60652 ZIP codes can sign up for an appointment at events.juvare.com/chicago/UCPOD/ with the code “CCVICHICAGO,” or by reaching the multilingual call center at (312) 746-4835.

Chicago residents from outside those ZIP codes who try to sign up will have their appointments canceled, according to a city flyer circulated by several community groups.

Chicago will be allotted 60% of the vaccines administered at the United Center for its residents, while Cook County and the state determine rules for other residents. That’s the latest change in a signup process that has caused confusion from the start.

Author(s): Mitchell Armentrout, Brett Chase

Publication Date: 10 March 2021

Publication Site: Chicago Sun-Times